St. Anne's Book Club, Monday, June 15, 7:30pm

The St. Anne's Book Club will meet on Monday, June 15 at 7:30 p.m. at the home of Jean Hampton. Contact Cathryn Conroy if you need the address. We will discuss "Deep Down Dark: The Untold Stories of 33 Men Buried in a Chilean Mine, and the Miracle That Set Them Free," by Héctor Tobar.

  All are welcome!

 If you're purchasing the book on Amazon, be sure to go there via our St. Anne's website, and St. Anne's will receive up to 5 percent of the sale price of the book.

http://saintannesdamascus.net/st-annes-shop/

 "Deep Down Dark"

When the San José mine collapsed outside of Copiapó, Chile in August 2010, it trapped thirty-three miners beneath thousands of feet of rock for a record-breaking sixty-nine days. The entire world watched what transpired above-ground during the grueling and protracted rescue, but the saga of the miners' experiences below the Earth's surface--and the lives that led them there--has never been heard until now.

 For "Deep Down Dark," the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Héctor Tobar received exclusive access to the miners and their tales. These thirty-three men came to think of the mine, a cavern inflicting constant and thundering aural torment, as a kind of coffin, and as a church where they sought redemption through prayer. Even while still buried, they all agreed that if by some miracle any of them escaped alive, they would share their story only collectively. Héctor Tobar was the person they chose to hear, and now to tell, that story.

 The result is a masterwork or narrative journalism--a riveting, at times shocking, emotionally textured account of a singular human event. "Deep Down Dark" brings to haunting, tactile life the experience of being imprisoned inside a mountain of stone, the horror of being slowly consumed by hunger, and the spiritual and mystical elements that surrounded working in such a dangerous place. In its stirring final chapters, it captures the profound way in which the lives of everyone involved in the disaster were forever changed.

St. Anne's Book Club, Monday April 20, 7:30pm

The St. Anne's Book Club will meet on Monday, April 20 at 7:30 p.m. at the home of Audrey Engstrom. E-mail the office if you need the address. We will discuss "Lila," by Marilynne Robinson. All are welcome!

If you're purchasing the book on Amazon, be sure to go there via our St. Anne's website, and St. Anne's will receive up to 5 percent of the sale price of the book.

http://saintannesdamascus.net/st-annes-shop/

"Lila," by Marilynne Robinson

Lila, homeless and alone after years of roaming the countryside, steps inside a small-town Iowa church-the only available shelter from the rain-and ignites a romance and a debate that will reshape her life. She becomes the wife of a minister and widower, John Ames, and begins a new existence while trying to make sense of the days of suffering that preceded her newfound security. Neglected as a toddler, Lila was rescued by Doll, a canny young drifter, and brought up by her in a hardscrabble childhood of itinerant work. Together they crafted a life on the run, living hand-to-mouth with nothing but their sisterly bond and a lucky knife to protect them. But despite bouts of petty violence and moments of desperation, their shared life is laced with moments of joy and love. When Lila arrives in Gilead, she struggles to harmonize the life of her makeshift family and their days of hardship with the gentle worldview of her husband which paradoxically judges those she loves. Revisiting the beloved characters and setting of Marilynne Robinson's Pulitzer Prize-winning "Gilead" and Orange Prize-winning "Home," Lila is a moving expression of the mysteries of existence.

 Upcoming date:

Monday, May 18, Location to be determined: "All the Light We Cannot See: A Novel," by Anthony Doerr

St. Anne's Book Club, March 16, 2015

St. Anne's Book Club

The St. Anne's Book Club will meet on Monday, March 16 at 7:30 p.m. at the home of Judy Partlow, 22408 Robin Court, Gaithersburg. We will discuss "Sycamore Row," by John Grisham. All are welcome!

If you're purchasing the book on Amazon, be sure to go there via our St. Anne's website, and St. Anne's will receive up to 5 percent of the sale price of the book.

http://saintannesdamascus.net/st-annes-shop/

"Sycamore Row: A Novel," by John Grisham

John Grisham takes you back to where it all began. One of the most popular novels of our time, "A Time to Kill" established John Grisham as the master of the legal thriller. Now we return to Ford County as Jake Brigance finds himself embroiled in a fiercely controversial trial that exposes a tortured history of racial tension. Seth Hubbard is a wealthy man dying of lung cancer. He trusts no one. Before he hangs himself from a sycamore tree, Hubbard leaves a new, handwritten will. It is an act that drags his adult children, his black maid, and Jake into a conflict as riveting and dramatic as the murder trial that made Brigance one of Ford County’s most notorious citizens, just three years earlier. The second will raises many more questions than it answers. Why would Hubbard leave nearly all of his fortune to his maid? Had chemotherapy and painkillers affected his ability to think clearly? And what does it all have to do with a piece of land once known as Sycamore Row?

Upcoming dates:

Monday, April 20 at the home of Audrey Engstrom: "Lila," by Marilynne Robinson

Monday, May 18, Location to be determined: "All the Light We Cannot See: A Novel," by Anthony Doerr

St. Anne's Book Club Feb. 23 7:30pm

The St. Anne's Book Club will meet on Monday, February 23 at 7:30 p.m. at the home of Mary Grubb, 16600 South Westland, Gaithersburg. We will discuss "The Invention of Wings," by Sue Monk Kidd. All are welcome!

Note we have changed the book club meetings to the third Monday of the month, instead of the first Monday.

"The Invention of Wings"

Hetty "Handful" Grimke, an urban slave in early nineteenth century Charleston, yearns for life beyond the suffocating walls that enclose her within the wealthy Grimke household. The Grimke's daughter, Sarah, has known from an early age she is meant to do something large in the world, but she is hemmed in by the limits imposed on women.

Kidd's sweeping novel is set in motion on Sarah's 11th birthday, when she is given ownership of 10-year-old Handful, who is to be her handmaid. We follow their remarkable journeys over the next 35 years, as both strive for a life of their own, dramatically shaping each other's destinies and forming a complex relationship marked by guilt, defiance, estrangement and the uneasy ways of love. As the stories build to a riveting climax, Handful will endure loss and sorrow, finding courage and a sense of self in the process. Sarah will experience crushed hopes, betrayal, unrequited love, and ostracism before leaving Charleston to find her place alongside her fearless younger sister, Angelina, as one of the early pioneers in the abolition and women's rights movements. This book was inspired by the historical figure of Sarah Grimke.

St. Anne's Book Club - January 19, 2015 7:30pm

The St. Anne's Book Club will meet on Monday, January 19 at 7:30 p.m. at the home of Mary Grubb. Contact the office for the address. We will discuss "The Invention of Wings," by Sue Monk Kidd. All are welcome!

Note we have changed the book club meetings to the third Monday of the month, instead of the first Monday.

"The Invention of Wings"

Hetty "Handful" Grimke, an urban slave in early nineteenth century Charleston, yearns for life beyond the suffocating walls that enclose her within the wealthy Grimke household. The Grimke's daughter, Sarah, has known from an early age she is meant to do something large in the world, but she is hemmed in by the limits imposed on women.

Kidd's sweeping novel is set in motion on Sarah's 11th birthday, when she is given ownership of 10-year-old Handful, who is to be her handmaid. We follow their remarkable journeys over the next 35 years, as both strive for a life of their own, dramatically shaping each other's destinies and forming a complex relationship marked by guilt, defiance, estrangement and the uneasy ways of love. As the stories build to a riveting climax, Handful will endure loss and sorrow, finding courage and a sense of self in the process. Sarah will experience crushed hopes, betrayal, unrequited love, and ostracism before leaving Charleston to find her place alongside her fearless younger sister, Angelina, as one of the early pioneers in the abolition and women's rights movements. This book was inspired by the historical figure of Sarah Grimke.